Tag Archives: Education Equity

Creating More Equitable Assessment for ELLs

Since the creation in 2002 of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), accountability and assessment of public education in the United States has been based on annual standardized state tests. These tests have been used to determine the effectiveness of states, districts, schools, and teachers in helping students learn.

Public school students in the United States are given more standardized tests, and are tested more frequently, than students in any other country. The growth of testing has fueled the world of assessment and turned it into a billion-dollar industry.

The number of tests has affected English Language Learners (ELLs) in the U.S. who, in addition to the annual standardized subject matter tests, are assessed every year on their English proficiency. Under NCLB, states not only had to identify English learners but also had to create English proficiency standards along with assessments that reflected these standards. Every year ELLs have to take state tests to determine if they are making progress in learning English and in attaining English-language proficiency. Continue reading

The Path to Educational Equity

Educational Equity and Changing Demographics in the U.S.

Equity commitment - Educational equity
* KPM: Key Performance Measure
The promise of the Brown v. the Board of Education ruling was that all children would have equal access to a world-class public education.  Despite great advances in public education, existing structural and social barriers continue to limit many children’s access to a good education. Thus the movement for educational equity in the classroom continues.

Research by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has shown that overall social mobility has not risen in OECD countries and in some places inequalities of income and wealth have increased. In the United States, there has been a rise in childhood poverty from 17% in 2000 to 22% in 2015 (Kids Count, 2015). Studies have found that the poorest students are nearly four times as likely to fail in math than their wealthiest peers. Continue reading